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Ashley Sanders Garcia is Vice Chair of the Digital Humanities Program at UCLA. She holds a Ph.D. in History with a specialization in Digital Humanities from Michigan State University and a B.S. in both History and Mathematics from Western Michigan University.  A comparative colonial historian, her research explores the development of settler colonies in the United States and French Algeria.  Her first publication, “A Study of the Teaching Methods of High School History Teachers,” appeared in The Social Studies, a peer reviewed journal, in 2008. Her most recent publications include a chapter on building a DH program, which will appear in the latest book in the Debates in DH series, Institutions, Infrastructures at the Interstices (forthcoming), a maturity framework for DH centers (http://bit.ly/ECAR-DH), and the University of Nebraska Press is currently considering her historical manuscript, “Between Two Fires: The Origins of Settler Colonialism in the United States and French Algeria,” for publication. Her first Digital Humanities book project, entitled, “Visualizing History’s Fragments: A Computational Approach to Humanistic Research,” is under consideration with Emerald Press (London, UK).  In addition, she has begun work on her third book, entitled, “Imperial Margins: Ethnicity, Gender, and Identity in Ottoman-Algeria, 1518-1837.”

Digital Humanities tutorials, workshop materials, and reflections on her work as an educator are available at AshleyRSanders.com.

5 Comments

  1. Your dissertation sounds fantastic, and, from my understanding of the field, much needed.

    December 12, 2013
    |Reply
    • Thank you so much! My work fits in the new and growing field of settler colonial studies, so there’s still much to explore and understand. It also situates Indigenous Studies, as well as American and Algerian history in a broader context, one that I hope will inspire new perspectives on each. Stay tuned for more updates in the coming weeks, and let me know if you have any questions or suggestions. I would love to use this blog to spark interesting discussions around the topics I explore here.

      December 12, 2013
      |Reply
    • I might be beaintg a dead horse, but thank you for posting this!

      October 25, 2016
      |Reply
  2. Aek
    Aek

    I may say that I am working in the opposite direction, although I am not a historian. But, how are you going to explore the “indigenous” views apart from the use of historical-bibliographical data (text and hypertext)? Although my PhD was on the Algerian communities in northern and southern Europe, I am currently reading literature on American philosophy and African-American studies because I think there are some parallels (with obvious differences) with the suffering of Algerians during the cruel and ferocious French colonization and their current experiences in the West.

    March 5, 2014
    |Reply
  3. Aek
    Aek

    I may say that I am working in the opposite direction, although I am not historian. But, how are you going to explore the “indigenous” viewpoints apart from analyzing historical-bibliographical (text and hypertext) data, mainly in the case of Algeria? Although my PhD was on Algerian communities in southern and northern Europe, I am currently reading literature on American philosophy and African-American studies as I think that there are amazing parallels (obviously, each case has its own contextual peculiarities) with the suffering of Algerian during the cruel and ferocious French colonization and its consequences can be seen even in their presence in the West through migration and settled communities.

    March 5, 2014
    |Reply

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